// photo editor

elliott morgan - photography director - fiasco magazine
interviews - thoughts - features

Taryn Wilsea is a photographer from Mancehster, UK

Photography Spotlight  |  Arvida Bystrom

“I am a London based, Swedish born photographer soon to turn 22. I’ve been working with various magazines and commercial shoots as well as what I favour the most, my own private projects.”

What influences you as a photographer?

Tumblr. Internet. Life.

Which photographers do you admire?

Mostly loads of my friends. Maja Malou Lyse and I are good friends and I really like her work. Beth Siveyer behind girls get busy takes great photo too!!! And then just any kind of massive girl gangs from online even though they might not do photography, I totally admire gals like Grace Miceli, Gabby Gabby, Molly Soda and more.

How would you describe your style?

Idk. It might change from time to time.

What are your plans for the next year?

No clue.

http://arvidabystrom.se

Interview by Elliott Morgan


Dirk Kikstra, talking about his time assisting Richard Avedon
Fiasco Magazine 

Sept 2004.  the phone rings, upon answering, all I hear on the other
end is a fumbling line and then a clearing of the throat. “Dirk, Dick,
Is everything ready for D.C.?” “Yes Dick, no problems” “Great” “How is
it going in Texas?” “Wonderful, I really think this project is coming
together, can’t wait to be in D.C.”, “OK, see you soon” “Bye” “Bye”.
That’s it, the last conversation I had with Dick. Short but sweet,
kind of like most of the words we spoke. Dick was in Texas working on
a project for the New Yorker, that would become Democracy, the next
day he was admitted into the hospital and within a week he would be
gone.

My relationship with Dick started a few years before I had even meet
him. He was Richard Avedon to me then. In 1994, I was at school
studying to become a photographer (a car photographer to be exact).
American Photo came out with a special issue dedicated in big letters
to AVEDON, with a picture of a man covered in bees and a women in
front of elephants. Little did I even dream that in five years from
studying that issue with its lighting diagrams, peeks into his
equipment room and stories about his famous pictures, that I too would
be walking every day past a huge print of Dovema and the Elephants to
my desk, my desk as assistant to Richard Avedon. The road to that desk
was fairly surreal, I guess like most whom ended up working for Dick.

After completing school in Santa Barbara, I headed up to San
Francisco.   Starting my first job, in a still life studio, which
extended my technical base that I had learned at university. People,
had always been my biggest fear, I based my whole school curriculum
around not having to take portraiture class. Once comfortable with a
person it was OK, but going up and asking a stranger a question, much
less asking to take a picture was death to me. Some how my time in San
Francisco change all that, I wanted to  conquer my fear, I wanted to
become a fashion photographer.  With that in mind I knew I had to move
to the fashion photo capital of the world New York City.  After a year
or so of assisting various advertising and fashion photographers, a
friend from school, told me of a freelance position working for
Patrick Demarchelier.  The man who was shooting everything from
Harper’s Bazaar to princess Diana. I thought I had made it.  Working
for Patrick was wonderful, he was doing up to three sittings a day and
there was always a lot of energy in the studio, he was at the height
of his career. The same friend who got me in the door at Patricks,  I
forgot to mention previously, was  Richard Avedons assistant. A few
months into my Demarchelier adventure he calls again.  ”Can you stop
freelancing for Patrick and take a full-time position as second
assistant here at the `Avedon Studio?” I had to think for a few
seconds “Yes!”.

The Avedon studio has run on a hierarchy system for as long as anyone
can remember. Assistants are selected from top schools as interns,
then if there is a full time position, it is filled by the best
intern. One starts as a fourth assistant, then moves up to a third,
who hands film (8x10) on set and is in charge of equipment checks and
dark room supplies. As the top moves on, so do the other positions,
once you get to second assistant you are on camera, focusing, cropping
and following Dicks framing requests, also as second you are printing
all the black and white prints that come out of the studio. One does
the printing so that when he is promoted to first (studio manager)
assistant he has a full understanding of how Dick wants things lite.
We all learned from each other and mostly from the handed down system.
So me coming in as a second assistant and becoming first with in a
year and a half was quit rare and exciting.

I knew a few inside things before my first meeting (interview) with
Dick, one, he himself is rather short, so does not always like tall
people. The staff had warned Dick of my height and sold me as a
"Gentle Viking". Dick also runs his studio like a Samurai, he will cut
your hand off for little mistakes, but is forgiving on big blunders
and would say  ”You only get better when things go wrong!” I had never
been so nervous to meet someone, after all he was the man that shaped
modern fashion photography and had conquered both commerce and art. My
nerves were  tested even more on the first day of photographing, “Oh
God, I hope it’s all in focus” was all I could think about until the
film rolled out of the dark room. The next day as Dick walked into the
studio, my joy came out, by picking him up (later I heard from
witnesses his feet where dangling  off the ground) and screaming “It’s
great and in focus!”.

I had the luck to come into the studio at a wonderful time, we were
shooting major campaigns (Dior, Hermes, Oscar del la Renta),  printing
books (Made in France, Portraits) and we were working on a major
retrospective of his work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It was
wonderful watching him direct and delegate through all that work.  He
spent everyday working and thinking about his craft. The funny thing
is, with all the time spent together, on trips or around the lunch
table or at sittings he rarely spoke about “photography”, He spoke
often and passionately about literature or the theater (his big love)
or politics, but photography came up sparsely and really only to
convey a feeling he wanted to get in an image on instructions before a
sitting.

Dick had many sides to him, the crazy, demanding artist that would hit
you if you were not loading film fast enough or kick an art director
out for asking a stupid question (Is there going to be detail in the
black?) but also the compassionate human that called  me about a
hundred time while my wife was in labor with our first child. I think
that that is why is was so good, yes he had talent and yes was at the
right place at the right time, and most certainly yes he had amazing
drive, but most of all it was his perfect balance between demanding
artist and compassionate human.  For all that I count my self
incredibly luck to have spent almost five years with him.  I often
still think of him, “What would Dick do?”, when I’m working on a
fashion story or photographing a cover, or portraying a famous person.
 I’m still to a certain point that shy student in California, but now
I have the confidence that Dick gave me.
 
By Elliott Morgan

 

18 year old British photographer Ash Kingston has updated his page 

 

Sam Bush is a Photographer based in London. He runs the blog and in my hands a camera and has a BA Degree in Photojournalism from the London College of Communication. Selected clients include The ObserverTropics 
London
, Penguin Books, Birthdays and a number of record labels including Holy Roar, Tangled Talk and Bridge Nine.

Photography Spotlight  |  Lasse Dearman

The Danish photographer Lasse Dearman takes incredibly intimate portraits infused with a sometimes very lonely beauty.

How did you begin photography?

I began taking pictures a few years ago, shooting on a digital SLR camera. I mostly did live music for blogs and such but it got boring really quick so I decided to get a point and shoot camera so I could get closer to my subject.

What inspires you?

I like the work by photographers such as Ed Templeton, Nick Haymes, Larry Clark, JH Engström, Sandy Kim, Bruce Davidson, etc. But for the kind of photography I do now, I would say my surroundings inspires me to take pictures.

What is important about self publishing?

It gives every photographer an opportunity to show their work, in a different way rather than putting it on a website. To become a good photographer you need to be good at editing and selecting your work in order to develop your own photographic language. When you publish your own work, you’ll be in control in the way your images are presented, and put together.

What advice would you give to young photographers?

Don’t wait for anything to happen, DIY!

What’s your plans for the future?

I’ve recently been working on an exhibition together with my friend Albert Elm, which is opening at Krabbesholm Hoejskole in Denmark. We are also working together on a book with Nick Lynch, which will hopefully be published in December by Bronze Age Editions.

www.lassedearman.tumblr.com 

Interview by Elliott Morgan

Photography Spotlight  |  Anna Victoria Best 

It’s not every day that a 19 year old Geordie gets car-blanche to dive into the clandestine world of glam-rock icons the New York Dolls.
Am intrigue in personality and the individual has sparked a talent for this fashion documentary style photography, combined with her northern charm, Anna has become a regular with i-D, Used and featured on Vogue.com.
Now aged 22, the self taught photographer and film maker has come a long way from emptying ash trays at her aunties salon in Newcastle.
annavictoriabest.com
By Elliott Morgan

Photography Spotlight  |  Anna Victoria Best 

It’s not every day that a 19 year old Geordie gets car-blanche to dive into the clandestine world of glam-rock icons the New York Dolls.

Am intrigue in personality and the individual has sparked a talent for this fashion documentary style photography, combined with her northern charm, Anna has become a regular with i-D, Used and featured on Vogue.com.

Now aged 22, the self taught photographer and film maker has come a long way from emptying ash trays at her aunties salon in Newcastle.

annavictoriabest.com

By Elliott Morgan

Photography Spotlight  |  Balint Barna

New talent, Balint Barna, is 22 and hails from Budapest and in his final year at Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design in Budapest. Spare and sleek, Balint has been focusing on fashion and portraiture for the past 18 months and worked with Elle Man, Glamour, SID, I love fake, amongst others.

What initially drew you to fashion and portrait photography?
It all began in New York when I spent a couple of weeks there when I was 18. I used a Canon T70 with black and white negative films. Literally, I shot everything. After I got my really first digital camera and then I had my first shoot with my very close friend, who was a model as well. So this is how it started.

Which photographers/artists influence you?
It’s always changing but I could courageously say I really like Alasdair McLellan and David Sims. I admire some young photographers as well, Brett Lloyd and Michal Pudelka. There is an artist, Baptiste Debombourg who also gives me lots of inspiration. Next to artists I draw inspiration from movies, I’m a huge fan of Haneke.

How would you describe your style?
It’s actually fairly hard to describe at the moment. After 2 years I would say I’m on my way to find my own style. I spent 6 months in London and it gave me motivation. Actually, it gave it back to me because I lost all of my inspiration in Budapest at that time. It was just the perfect time to discover London and meet new people.

What do you like about the creative scene in London?
I got inspired by people. The way they create and they are totally free. That’s the most important thing to be free when you are creating something. I met many many poeple from the industry and I’m really pleased that I made friends with loads of them. There are so many up and coming talents in London and they support each other. It’s very appealing to me.

What are your plans for the future?
First of all, I’m going to finish my studies this year in Budapest. I really enjoyed London, and can imagine I’m moving back next year for good.

www.balintbarna.com

Interview by Elliott Morgan

Photography Spotlight  |  Will Corry

“My name is Will Corry, I’m 20 years old and based in London. I left college two years ago where I studied photography as well as art and design. I like to take pictures and go to the darkroom to print my work.”

How did your love of photography begin?
I have always enjoyed taking photos but my love for photography really began when I started college and had the opportunity to understand and appreciate photography and other photographer’s work which would influence me hugely. This is also where I discovered the darkroom which I still use today, and for me is all part of the process of making a photograph.

At what point did you decide to follow photography on a more serious level?
Whilst at college I knew that the only thing I wanted to do was photography, but it wasn’t until I was around 17 and I started assisting photographers that I realised that it could be more then just a hobby.

What would be your dream project?
Good subjects. Good light. I really enjoy visiting new places and taking photographs along the way.

What can we expect from you in the future?
More of the same. I want to keep learning, developing and making photos that I like to look at.

By Elliott Morgan

Photography Spotlight  |  Lars Weber
Weber grew up on the countryside in northern Germany and completed his studies in communication design at the Design Factory in Hamburg, Germany. Via his string engagement to design and the arts, he was able to finalize his studies with distinction one semester earlier.
Lars was part of the team developing the international fashion magazine ODDA and largely responsible for the visually stunning layout. During this time he also had some corresponding commissions from several different clients, designing & developing corporate identities. He’s worked on and produced countless photo projects in the fashion segment, for different magazines, exhibitions and designers. His passion for story telling photo shoots arouses emotions and portrays edgy and strong personalities.
Lars worked with the a London based agency and as an Art Director for Blonde Magazine. Currently he’s working for the advertising agency Scholz & Friends in Hamburg as an Art Director for photography.

At what age did you realise your interest in photography?
I started with photography in at the age of 18. I wanted to learn how the the technology of the camera work before I started studying communications design. Then I loved it more and more and couldn’t stop.


What advice would you give to young photographers?
Just try and error. There is no right or wrong. I don’t think you have to study photography to be a good photographer. You learn it by doing it. You just need the eye for angles, the sense of aesthetics and the ideas.


Who inspires you?
I am inspired by my hard working parents. I admire various artists like Hedi Slimane, his simple but powerful pictures. And I feel inspired by my surroundings, my friends.


What are your plans for the future?
I hope to improve my skills and get better in everything I do. I want to discover so many inscovered places, get to know more inspiring people and travel.


 www.thelarsweber.com

By Elliott Morgan

Photography Spotlight  |  Lars Weber

Weber grew up on the countryside in northern Germany and completed his studies in communication design at the Design Factory in Hamburg, Germany. Via his string engagement to design and the arts, he was able to finalize his studies with distinction one semester earlier.

Lars was part of the team developing the international fashion magazine ODDA and largely responsible for the visually stunning layout. During this time he also had some corresponding commissions from several different clients, designing & developing corporate identities. He’s worked on and produced countless photo projects in the fashion segment, for different magazines, exhibitions and designers. His passion for story telling photo shoots arouses emotions and portrays edgy and strong personalities.

Lars worked with the a London based agency and as an Art Director for Blonde Magazine. Currently he’s working for the advertising agency Scholz & Friends in Hamburg as an Art Director for photography.

At what age did you realise your interest in photography?
I started with photography in at the age of 18. I wanted to learn how the the technology of the camera work before I started studying communications design. Then I loved it more and more and couldn’t stop.
What advice would you give to young photographers?
Just try and error. There is no right or wrong. I don’t think you have to study photography to be a good photographer. You learn it by doing it. You just need the eye for angles, the sense of aesthetics and the ideas.
Who inspires you?
I am inspired by my hard working parents. I admire various artists like Hedi Slimane, his simple but powerful pictures. And I feel inspired by my surroundings, my friends.
What are your plans for the future?
I hope to improve my skills and get better in everything I do. I want to discover so many inscovered places, get to know more inspiring people and travel.
By Elliott Morgan
Chloe Norgaard by Tim Barber 

Chloe Norgaard by Tim Barber